The Colosseum
"As long as the Colosseum, there will Rome when the Colosseum falls, Rome will also fall, but when Rome falls, the world will fall"

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Tourist and historical information about the Basilica of Saint Peter and the Vatican Museums
Vatican museum and the Sistine Chapel Hours
Open: From monday to saturday from 9:00 to 16:00 (Closed after 18:00), and all last sundays of month(free entrance) from 9:00 to 12:30 (Closed after 14:00).
Closed: All sundays, holidays and on 1 may, 11 june (Corpus Domini), 29 june (SS Pietro e Paolo)

Tickets
Entire: 16 €
Reduced: 8 €, valid for boys from 6 and 18 age, students until 26 age (with certificate), priests, religious, pilgrimage upon submission of a request.

For more details about reduction Click here

For reservation online (avoiding the queue) Click here



St Peter's Basilic Vatican State symbol and center of Catholicism, St. Peter's Basilica is the largest of the four papal basilicas of Rome and the largest Catholic church in the world.
While the primitive Basilica of St. Peter was erected around 320 by Emperor Constantine at the place where, according to tradition, the Apostle Peter was buried, the present basilica was begun April 18, 1506 under Pope Julius II and ended in 1626, during the pontificate of Pope Urban VIII
The emblem of the basilica and of the entire city of Rome is the Dome that, built in two years by Giacomo Della Porta, following the designs of Michelangelo, is surprising in size and harmony: 133 meters high, 41, 50 meters in diameter (a little lower than that of the Pantheon) and 537 steps from the building's base to the lantern
The monumental Piazza San Pietro, built by Gian Lorenzo Bernini between 1657 and 1667, and the splendid colonnade of 284 columns of the Doric order and eighty-eight travertine pillars, is crowned by the basilica. Columns are arranged radially in four rows so as to maintain the proportional relationships between spaces and columns even in external files.
So the viewer reaching the porphyry disks at the sides of the obelisk sees the colonnade as consisting of a single row of columns!


Sant'Angelo castel Built around 123 d.C. As a sepulcher for Emperor Hadrian and his family, Castel Sant'Angelo accompanies for almost two thousand years the fate and history of Rome.
From a fortified foremost funerary monument, from a dark and terrible jail to a splendid Renaissance home that is active in its Michelangelo walls, from the Risorgimento Prison to the current museum.
The remains of the original mausoleum of Emperor Hadrian are well visible in the lower partitions of the building. The large travertine blocks that cover the walls clearly show the holes of the metal grapples that anchored the Roman marble coating.
The transformation of the building from a funerary monument to a fortified outpost is about 271 dC. When, under the Emperor Aurelian, he was adapted to the fortress and became definitive in 403 with the inclusion of the building in the Aurelian walls.
It was Pope Niccolò V, about 1450, to furnish the castle of a real apartment and, fifty years later, Pope Borgia ordered the construction of a new, luxurious apartment with gardens and fountains and decorated by Pinturicchio.
From the 17th century Castel Sant'Angelo seems to gradually lose the role of residence to form itself almost exclusively as a prison; Carbonari and patriots consume their days of imprisonment between these walls, until at least September 20, 1870, when Rome was proclaimed the capital of the young Kingdom of Italy.
Then, in the wide boulevards of the Lungotevere, two bastions of the pentagonal wall are cut down; the moats that run around the building are buried; some buildings of Pope Urban VIII are grounded; Also causes the contemporary rise of the road level, the height of the facade of the castle is considerably reduced.
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